Wild Rose - Wild Roses


American Vetch
Balsamroot
Bull Thistle
Butter & Eggs
Canada Goldenrod
Cattail
Common Plantain
Dandelion
Dwarf Dogwood
False Solomons Seal
Fireweed
Great Mullein
Indian Paintbrush
Lady Fern
Lupine
Oxeye Daisy
Pineapple Weed
Red Clover
Sagebrush
Salal
Stinging Nettle
Tiger Lily
Wild Rose
Wood Strawberry
Yarrow
Yellow Water Lily
Animals
Birds
Fish
Wildflowers
Trees
Survival
Parks
Trails





British Columbia Outdoor Wilderness Guide
Wild Roses
Wild Rose
(Rosa acicularis)
a.k.a. prickly rose
Wild Rose's scientific name 'acicularis' means 'prickly'.
This shrub, which can grow up to 15 metres tall, is famous for its prickly stems with their beautiful pale pink flowers and nutritious 'rosehips'

LEAVES:
- the leaves of the Wild Rose are divided into 5 to 7 small sawtoothed or doubly toothed leaflets
- they can be slightly hairy underneath
FLOWERS:
- Wild Rose flowers are large, pink and fragrant
- one flower grows at the end of each of the side branches
- turn into bright red seed pods or hips
FRUIT:
- scarlet or bright red seed bods with a pear shape
- The fruit of the Wild Rose is called 'hips' or 'rosehips'
- can be up to an inch in diameter
- stay on the bush all winter
HABITAT:
- Wild Roses grow in low to medium elevations
- Wild Roses are found through most of British Columbia
- Wild Roses appear in clearings, open forests, rocky slopes
FASCINATING FACTS:
- while the floral emblem of Alberta, Wild Roses grow profusely in BC too
- the Wild Rose is very similar to the wood rose
- the rosehips, which have an applelike flavour, are very high in vitamin C (a better source than orange juice)
- popular food for people and wildlife; fruit, stem and foliage are all eaten by wildlife, people use the young shoots, fruit, stems, flowers and leaves
- the rosehips can be made into jams, syrups and jellies (extremely popular in Europe); The hips are best picked immediately after the first frost. Open a few to be sure the plant is not infested with worms or bugs. (usually not the case, but can happen)
- tea can be made from the Wild Rose petals, leaves and even the roots; and appealing 'julep' can be made from soaking fresh petals with an equal amount of cool water, then adding lemon juice and honey
- native peoples ate the rind of the rosehips and left the seeds
- the cambium from the roots was prepared by soaking and boiling and then made into an ointment for sore eyes
- arrows have been made from rose wood

Follow Us On Facebook



List of BC Adventure
Advertisers

Site Info
Advertise With Us
Awards
About Us
Contact Us
Free Vacation Guides
BC Vacation Guides
Coastal Vacations
Thompson Okanagan
EcoTourism
Fishing Vacations
Guest Ranch Guide
Romantic Getaways
Wilderness Vacations
Winter Vacations
The Rockies Guide
Login







Wild Rose - Wild Roses